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to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war in the year after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was 1943, a correspondent named eugene burns wrote a very good contemporary book called "then there was one." and that title refer today the fact that at the height of the guadalcanal campaign, which was the most closely-fought air/sea/land campaign in the war, only enterprise remained afloat of our six carriers that had combat in the pacific in 1942. the only other survivor was uss saratoga which sustained heavy battle damage on two occasions and, therefore, missed almost the entirety of that year. so considering that ed stafford wrote a 200,000-word or book about the enterprise, what is it that here 50 years later warrants another one? and i think there's a couple of reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that rotated enterprise during the entire war. but he's told me in a couple of e-mails that he wished he had been able to write a longer book -- and it took him five years
of the first sewer systems were on the east coast of the united states, often in places that already had developed a citywide water supply system. sullivan: in 1630, boston was basically three mountains, there were very steep hills. waste would run down quickly and dump into the harbor. and the tide would carry most of it away. well, this worked well for a while. the problem was, as boston wanted to expand, it started filling in the mudflats. the water could come rushing down the hill, it would hit the flat area and slow down. at high tide, it couldn't get out at all. it got so bad that the city took over, 'cause the city has a responsibility to protect its citizens. boston built the first modern sewer system in the united states. ours was completed between 1877 and 1884. with this wonderful new sewer system, we were taking our filth and moving it out to the ocean. of course, all of this was untreated. in the 1960s, we were still pumping all of our sewage out to moon island, untreated. we would get swimmers here, never knowing, in the middle of summer, why you would have a cold. well, we
was essential to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was early 43 and the correspondent wrote a very good contemporary book that title referred to the fact at the heart of the canal can pay and which was the closely fought campaign in the pacific war enterprise was in our carriers combat in the pacific in 1922 the only other survivor was the uss saratoga which sustained on two occasions and therefore miss to the entirety for that year of years later couple reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that go through the enterprise during the entire war but he's told in a couple of e-mails he wished that they had been able to write a longer book and a road to the cut took him five years to write this one that would include more of the ship's company with with the navy called white hats, the steelers between them and the commission officers and the sheep petty officers who need the ship work and consequently, i wanted to devote a good
in united states army. screaming eagles and 101st division. these guys are real man. brett thank you for your years of service. folks, this country is you all know. i apologize, i've been here for a half an hour i want you to know that. i don't want any record saying i was late. the good news was, there was 250 people still trying to get in. i apologize for our all standing this long. to state the obvious, this country faces the starkest choice for president in my memory. now that governor romney an congressman ryan have been nominated -- i don't need your boos, we need your votes. now that they're a team, i mean this sincerely, those stark differences are more stark. congressman ryan have given a absolutely clear definition for governor romney's vague commitment. in a strange way, we have two incumbent parties. we know exactly what they the other team will do. the reason we do, the house republican party has already passed the ryan budget. has already put in place everything that romney says he's promising to do for the whole nation. take a look at what they did and we will point o
brazil, china, india and russia gang up on the united states. he says it's a bad idea for america to be number one, he calls that america and germany, he wants to end it, he wants two, three, four, and five to come together and pull america down. >> lou: and why is such a man tolerated? what is the point? what does he bring to the students of harvard university? what kind of madness, like the fools who thought that the euro would replace the dollar and wonderfully sophisticated trans atlantic geniuses thought the dollar's days are done. haven't we had enough of that nonsense. >> this guy is not only tolerated, but separated and of course, obama took his courses and retained a close relationship and when the 2008 election, he skipped town, i'm a leftist and revolutionary, if anybody connects me with obama, it's going to hurt obama. he's a cocoon that protect the sillness and represent some insight into the future, and-- you're right the problem is when it's taken by a guy in the oval office to endorse pablam, and encores in the united states. >> and tell when what it means when the
is it that the united states pays 22% of the bill and japan pays only 12% ? guest: china, i think the number is 3.1%. that is what is insane. if you add in the money they get from the one, it is much lower. host: in germany, they only have 80 million people, they pay 8%. guest: we are suckers. they know, our checkbooks are open. i have no problem giving $8 billion to the u.n. if i knew it was working. if i knew these people were solved and the problems of the world, i have no problem. the reality is, they are throwing the money away. we are acting as classic enablers. no different than somebody who is unable in a drug addict or a gambler. if it continued to give these people what they want without forcing behavior, what forces them to change their behavior? host: here is another excerpt. guest: the ivory coast was a former french colony. they had independence. they have had a number of major problems. a civil war raging on for years. the u.n. came in. host: you are trying to interview somebody. guest: trying to. the head of the un peacekeeping. host: let's watch a little bit. >> i grabbed my came
that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and then i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of a member of the city college board of trustees for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, if i could present to you, rodrigo santos, the newest member of our board of trustees. [applause] >> i am honored for this great appointment. as a new member of the board of trustees, i can tell you i will do everything in my power to ensure not only do we follow the great work of former trustee milton marks. that great legacy of public service. but at the same time, i join an institution that must be saved, an institution that must be preserved.
. this is a manifestation of that ongoing conflict. the united states has been attacking these elements steadily in recent years through the use of drums and the elements are trying to find ways to strike back. a big maybe the timing is interesting because in the aftermath of the raid, pakistan- u.s. relations hit rock bottom. they're starting to improve, so maybe it is trying to rekindle those tensions. >> his id emboldening militants and pakistan? >> there is a dynamic between afghanistan and pakistan. the united states as tried to get some of these elements to negotiate a peace settlement and they have been unwilling to do that. notwithstanding the united states strategy to appeal some of the elements of the violence strategy in the political process, this war continues. >> can you tell us about the location of today's attack? >> is a major pakistan the city. and what makes it a significant is the proximity to the largely under-governed tribal areas. that is where they are based, where the taliban escape to in the aftermath of u.s. and international intervention. it is the remaining safe haven where th
target a bay area hospital. hear why they say child birth in the united states is all wrong. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow. you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah, blah, blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no, we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver. only from at&t u-verse. get a free wireless receiver with a qualifying u-verse plan. rethink possible. . >>> clean up underway in the wake of hurricane isaac as the death toll rices and crews rescue those trapped by the floodwaters. >> need a hammer to break the window. >> officials in the city of braceway say the bodies avenue of a man and woman were found bringing the death toll to five. many evacuated their homes and are just now returning to assess the damage. >> part of living onto river you will live in the river eventually. >> we
-- of our warriors have been wounded. romney thought of the decision of the president of the united states, we have other countries working with us, nato and afghanistan. the president organized it. all 50 of them said it is time to hand over responsibility to the afghans and bring our 90,000 troops home. what did romney say? he said, that was a mistake. i have seen these warriors. i have traveled in and out of afghanistan and iraq over 20 times. i have seen these kids -- not kids, i have seen these men and women. i have been in the operating base above the mountains and the valley with six kids getting shot at every single night. cold and people off. i have been out there in those armored humvees, the scorching desert. i wish every american could see what i saw on the strips. they raise their right hand with a recruiter and said, i want to join, knowing almost certainly that they would go to iran or afghanistan. -- iran or afghanistan. this is one of the finest generations in the history of america. they should be recognized. and they are. [cheers and applause] we only have one sacred obl
taken by immigration. there is a situation which you have an immigrant in the united states, even the legal residents there is a lot more power, he is boring to get custody of the child. the other one, i did not know if you know this, i did not share the concern about the actual domestic violence. the only concern is to make an example. i did not think the evidence supports the sheriff is a batterer. he made a mistake, but that is not battery. >> first of all, i want to thank you for service. and i know it has been a very long haul. you are essentially on during your term -- time under very trying servichy i am a long-time resident. he was elected by the people of san francisco, and it should be up to us, the voters, not the mayor or city attorney to decide if he is to remain as our share of. as for official misconduct, i see none other than that on the part of the mayor who took it upon himself to defy the will of the voters without due process or pay. he has taken full responsibility for his actions on the 31st. i take full responsibility. his wife, miss lopez, stands by her goe
america. there is the united states of america. there is not a black america and a white america and latino america and asian america. there is the united states of america. you know what i love about this country? trick question. i love everything about this country! including prilosec otc. you know one pill each morning treats your frequent heartburn so you can enjoy all this great land of ours has to offer like demolition derbies. and drive thru weddings. so if you're one of those people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day, block the acid with prilosec otc.. and don't get heartburn in the first place. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax works differently than other laxatives. it draws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to feel great. miralax. a thing that helps you wbuy other things.hing. but plenty of companies do that. so we make something else. we help make life a little easier, more convenient, more rewarding, mor
lived, or james madison, or abraham lincoln, would united states exist? if it did exist would be the same country we know to be? what other people have, thought, fill the shoes and done what they did, or would things be markedly different? for our purposes tonight, the question is if william f. buckley, jr. had not lived, what conservatism be what it is today or would it be different? would have been a conservative movement? had there been a conservative movement, which it had achieved the same success that it has achieved? i'm going to put that question aside for a moment and try to circle back to it later. let's start with who was buckley. well, he had six different careers, or he did things that would have been, would have filled careers for six people and made them whole and quite a few successful. let's start with the fact he was a syndicated columnist. he wrote for many, many, many years. in fact, up until he died, a column called on the right. at its height it was published three times a week in 350 newspapers. he was one of the most widely read columnists in the countr
a movie. host: look at this and we'll get comments on it. >> it was april 20, 2009 and the united states was opening the antiracism conference in geneva, switzerland, it was designed as a forum to reach the u.n.'s moral authority to end racism and discrimination, strengthening human rights everywhere. racism is a denial of human rights, pure and simple. there comes a time in the course of human kind when we must stand firm on the fundamental principles that binds us. there comes a time to reamp our faith in fundamental human rights and dignity and worth of us all. >> it was only the second conference of its kind in the u.n. 60 year history and as the secretary general concluded his opening remarks the man of united nations delivered the keynote -- tapped to deliver the keynote address wait the wings. >> the time is now, ladies and gentlemen. >> who would it stph-b who would it be, the guiding light who could lead the conference toward achieving its vital goals, who better than this guy,? >> and now to the podium -- >> [applause] >> this is mahmoud ahmadinejad, president of iran. somethin
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands on one nation, under god, indivisible with liberty and justice for all. >> i would like to call roll- call. [roll call] >> thank you very much. ladies and gentlemen, it will come to the august 29 at san francisco police commission meeting. this is our monthly meeting we held the last wednesday of the month in that community. we rotate these meetings through various district stations and tonight is the turn of captain tom in central station. i would like to welcome you. as the commissioner, this is one of the best parts of being on the commission, going out to the community once a month and the meeting at different communities and hearing from you what your concerns are. i see we are setting up with the interpreters, maybe i should slow down a bit. let me know when you are ready. what we usually do at the meeting is have the commissioners introduce themselves and tell us what they do during that day job. the police commission job is allegedly a part-time job, but it is far from a part-time job, but it is a very rewarding.
and say to the president of the united states, "you must act." we didn't think that the proposed bill was commensurate to all of the suffering, to the beatings, to the jailing, to the killing that had occurred in the south. amy goodman: congressman john lewis. he's just written a new book called across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change. i'll continue the interview with him in a moment. [break] [break] amy goodman: "ain't gonna let nobody turn me round," the sncc freedom singers, a group that traveled the country singing and fundraising for the student nonviolent coordinating committee. congressmember john lewis was one of the chairs of sncc. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report, as we return to my interview with the now 13- term democratic congressman, john lewis of georgia, arrested more than 40 times as he fought for voting rights and against segregation in america. just before malcolm x was assassinated, john lewis met with him in africa. they spent several days together. i asked john lewis where they met, what they talked about. rep. j
the whole united states knows where petaluma is >>> petaluma is the eighth capital of the united states can you name the city in tennessee that beat petaluma? probably not but it has put the town and kids on the map. >>> and at this cool the sea lemans t v >>> kids show up i used to live in next deal it is heady stuff for a 12 or 30 year-old. have you ever done a tv interview >>> yes >>> they have been on national tv what post-game comments and espn and play-by-play and around the country >>> you cannot explain it it means the world to me to have these fans and and these people greeting for me >>> your 12 or 13 analysts people cheer for you tomorrow to go back to school you have homework to the girl's gonna like it >>> all yes >>> does it help you out with the girls? >>> no. >>> we'er back to sibling squabbles but it is a wonderful experience >>> another day the next day, the moments of great help their remember the moments >>> fame can be as fleeting as the confetti today. >>> they're raising money here first for the team they raised $60,000 and today raising money for the ugandan little l
of petaluma. everybody in the old united states knows what petaluma is >>> petaluma is the a capital of the united states canyon in the city in tennessee that beat petaluma. it is but the town and these kids on the map >>> it is pretty cool to see him on tv and stuff >>> it is heady stuff for a 12 or 13 year-old have ever done a tv interview before >>> yes >>> have you done interviews before two or three weeks ago >>> no. >>> now that ban on national tv and play by play advance across the country >>> it means the world to me that these fans and people here for me >>> your 12 or 13 have all these people applauding for you to marty go back to school you have homework. >>> to the girls kind of like it >>> yam >>> does this help you out with the girls? >>> note. >>> we'er back to sibling squabbles but it is wonderful what a great experience >>> the moments of great help their remember the moments >>> and then can be as fleeting as the confetti today. mike sugerman cbs 5 >>> the oakland a's raise more than $53,000 to fight cancer it was the breast cancer awareness day the tinsel and hats
. as a republican, she was in the minority. look at the trend lines in the united states. in the post world war ii, unions were necessary. the gis came home, they needed jobs. they seem to have a place in society. now, if you look at the trendlines, they are against us. we are against china, south america. a week, the people, are buying that. we are buying things for those countries. just follow the trend line. if you notice the of unemployment reports over the last couple of months, there has been a steady decline in union membership as cities and states have shed public-sector employees across the board. host: what is your bottom line for mike williams? caller: i know mike is trying to drum of union support, but at the end of the day, in my opinion, unionization in the u.s., in the public and private sector, is on the decline. host: mr. williams? guest: several points that i would respond to. first, i will not make any excuses or apologize for the past errors of organized labor. work practices where you have to bring in three people to bring in a light bulb as an example -- i am in construction.
, arms, and legs. >> what they said in the united states 20 years earlier. jazz, people don't know this, first inception in the 1920s was attacked roundly as primitive jungle music bringing down american youth. stalin and eastern europe said exactly the same things with the same words later on. stossel: rock n roll then came. >> more popular than jazz. millions of fans across eastern europe. by 1980s disco and rock in the 1980s were enormously popular throughout the communism world. stossel: relaxed the rules because they were losing. >> it was too late. then if he continues to repress this energy, this desire for freedom and pleasure, he'd lose. he let it go. western acts came in, and it took off from there. stossel: left the acts in, surprising. bruce springsteen drew a huge crowd in east germany. we have a clip of him singing "born in the usa." ♪ born in the usa stossel: in east germany, this is remarkable because so many people were there singing along to "born in the usa," and they were not allowed in the usa. >> that's right. great evidence this is enormous popularity signaling
two oil producing state in the united states. they just announced they have 42 times, not 42%, natural gas in ohio as they thought they did a year ago. i mean, just the drive of the energy sector under a romney administration generates in royalties, in taxes on new jobs and taxes on profits a major step towards the balanced budget. now you've got to control spending. paul ryan would be about as good a vice president as you could get if you wanted to have somebody. i mean, he will know more about the budget than the director of the budget. >> quick comment, and then i've got to go to a break. >> i'm all for exploiting our natural gas. it's incredible bounty. but if we don't do it as a bridge to a cleaner energy future we're going to burn up, choke up, heat up, smoke up and melt up this planet. far faster than even al gore predicts. >> all right. we're going to take a break here. i want to come back and talk a little bit about a big issue as we go into the democratic convention. gender politics. it was certainly big for the republicans. it will be big for the democrats as well. our polit
of doubt and decline. we can elect mitt romney the president of the united states and get america back on track. >> shepard: democrats had planned a similar tactic to send vice president bide ton florida during the convention in florida. the president called off that visit because hurricane isaac was hitting. congressman ryan is leading the charge against the president it would appear, carl? >> that's right, shep. republicans are making good their pledge to make this the most aggressive counter argument that's ever happened at a convention. they do site he had planned to be in florida at the republic national convention though they were interrupted by isaac. marco rubio, nikki haley, the governor of south carolina, governor of oklahoma as well. ryan gave what was more the most part a standard stump speech signal the question for the week for are you better off now as you were four years ago reagan made famous. here is paul ryan's 2012 rendition. >> every president since the great depression who asked americans to send them into a second term could say you are better off today than you
scores. ...the united states would be on that list. in 25th place. let's raise academic standards across the nation. let's get back to the head of the class. let's solve this. the blissful pause just before that rich sweetness touches your lips. the delightful discovery, the mid-sweetening realization that you have the house all to yourself. well, almost. the sweet reward, making a delicious choice that's also a smart choice. splenda no-calorie sweetener. with the original sugar-like taste you love and trust. splenda makes the moment yours. >>> coming up here, did clint eastwood overshadow an otherwise successful effort to reshape the >>> we're back with our political roundtable. joining me "new york times" columnist and co-author of "that used to be us" which is now out in an expanded paperback edition, tom friedman. former republican presidential candidate and speaker of the house, newt gingrich. presidential historian and author of "team of rivals," a new paperback edition will be out in october, doris kearns goodwin. former ceo of hewlett-packard, now vice chairman of the republican
petaluma is >>> petaluma is the eighth capital of united states has signified by the a cake canyon in the city in tennessee that beat petaluma, probably not. it has put the city and these kids on the map >>> it is cool to see him on tv and stuff >>> it is pretty heady stuff for a 12 or 13 year-old. at the ever done a tv interview before >>> yes >>> but before two weeks ago? >>> no. >>> you can't explain that it means the world to me to have all these fans and these people here for me >>> you are 12 or 13 and all this people cheer for you tomorrow you go back to school you have homework to. does it help you out with the girls? >>> no. >>> we'er back to the sibling squabbles and all that >>> just another day the next they sell the moments are greg i'll get there remember the moment. >>> fame as fleeting as the confetti that blew upon them today. mike sugerman cbs 5 >>> issue of labor unrest with nfl officials as many football fans on edge the league says it may have to use replacement rest during the opening games reporter tony guyana throws the penalty flag on that strategy >>> a r
country of my dreams, the united states of america, a country where everything is based on justice, a country of relationships of kissing someone in the right place and relationships like that do not exist. everything is based on fact, on hard work. they do not bring somebody down because they do not like him. i came to the united states because i believe in america. and i am a u.s. citizen. this whole thing is distressing me and my family because it is an example for all of the new generation in this country that you work hard and in the heat of the moment of the family dispute over your child, you pull your wife or your husband's hand and get bruised and you get treated like a criminal. i hear all these words like wrong for conduct, unlawful conduct. if i were not in this room, i would think she was a criminal who beat his wife appeared that she calls 911 all the to -- every day. yes, he lost his temper for a second, in my opinion, and he grabbed his wife. i tell my husband of 20 years sometimes that i do not like him. i even say bad things to him. but it does not mean that i mea
of the united states will play a strong part in the development of these vehicles. as well as we also started a venture firm. the venture fund operates out of new york. it started 15 months ago, we made our first investment in a company called my city way, which is working on intermodal transport. started in new york, now in 35 cities around the country and many cities around the world provided information to not only our customers, but also anyone interested in moving from a to be in a city. that has worked exceedingly well. as you have seen, we have been investing in other companies as well. the electric charging stations system is another one of those. as is our first in this and in parking. most of us leave our house is in the morning, go to work, part of our cars at work, leave a vacant parking space at home. if you can bring a marketplace together where someone can park under drive during the day, and of course, give them a certainty of where they will part, it works. many thousands of customers now are enjoying that has a potential different way of operating in the city. drive now was
with other western nations, including the united states, about their response to the syrian civil war. remember, last month, our president drew a line in the sand saying plans for possible military involvement would change if syria uses or even moves their potentially deadly chemical weapons. president obama's remarks came at height of the election season, of course, that same week, governor romney said fell elected he would send u.s. troops to syria to keep those weapons from falling into the wrong hands. the violence has reportedly reached a new milestone: according to groups in the country, 5,000 people were killed in syria's civil war during the month of august, alone. if true, it is the highest one-month death toll since the crisis started to unfold more than 17 months ago. the chief fox correspondent, jonathan hunt, is in new york city with that report. a new united nations envoy is taking over for kofi annan but he does not sound optimistic. >>jonathan: he does not. he is a well traveled algerian diplomat, who, in fact, brought about an end to the lebanese civil war in 1990. bu
that it brushes up against what you hold dear is -- >> right now in the united states i'm what's called an indigenouser, the errapin tribes person, and our people are being used for medical experimentation right now. there's a genocide against us, and nobody cares because it doesn't effect them. and this is moral relativity. if our morality was based on our physiology and there was absolute right and wrong, this could not be happening. >> that's, i mean, that's -- i would just try to bring to you awareness that there are many nietzsche readers who would think that nietzsche's philosophy would be as outraged as you are, he would just use different arguments why it's outrageous. so, anyway, thank you. thank you very much for coming. [applause] >> is there a nonfiction author or book like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv@cspan.org, or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. >>> in 1942 bill manbo and his family were relocated from their hollywood home to heart mountain relocation center, a japanese-american internment camp in wyoming. while at the camp, mr. manbo took numerou
. american citizen of course in the united states and therefore under the 14th amendment is citizen by birth. he went to hollywood high school, was in the class of 1921 at hollywood high. when off to the frank wickens street school to study to be anonymous can act. he graduated in 1923 and he opened up a garage in hollywood. he liked model race tires and he loved photography, was an amateur photographer. he also developed an alias for himself that he used at times. his name was bill manbo. he developed a version of his name that he would use. he would refer to himself as p. airtran for =tranfour and he changed the spelling of the last name so would not be manbo. and there's actually a photograph in this collection of his baric. he has built a little foyer with plywood in front of the door and arching artistically across this little entryway is the name manbo right here at heart mountain. he was a bit of the character. no question about it. this is the lot of his family. in the middle, to older folks on the middle. and the these genes out. his father-in-law and next to him his wife, bill manb
for gremine, did you ever dream that you'd be working with poor people in the united states of america? >> no. i think the world's biggest, richest country of the world. and the formula we developed that is the poorest country of the world. >> the united states is a country that everyone thinks has money, doesn't have any poor people. we have more than 45 million people living in poverty in the united states. >> and he says it takes much more than financing to help them break out of it. business counselling, keeping the books, paying bills, even opening savings accounts, which is required of borrowers. even that is often not enough. joe salvaggio, a former catholic priest who's worked for decades with poor people, says many who would be entrepreneurs fail because their finances are precarious. >> if they got sick or their kids got sick or the landlord, there was a storm and they got some physical damage or something. setbacks happen to people. so often they don't have one time to get a check to somebody, she put it in the bank and she had so many bank overdrafts that it ate up almost the whol
working worldwide are working in the united states. we're producing more, we're using less. that's a path to energy independence, and i like that. jenna: so it's interesting that you're a democrat and you're governor of montana because i went back and lookedded at some of the voting records in your state, and if you look at the way your state has voted in the presidential lengths, it's voted mainly republican going back to the clintons, right now it looks like your state leaning towards mitt romney. why are you supporting the president? what is it about the president that continues to get your support when the people that you represent may not be as convinced? >> oh, gosh, i think it's been since lbj since a democrat got to 50% in montana, so that's not unusual. but this president was, inherited one of the worst economies in the history of this country. 29 consecutive months of increasing private sector jobs. by the way, all over this country we've been decreasing public sector jobs. in montana public sector jobs are down by 4.2%, and we're at 6.5% unemployment. so we've created 4.5 milli
lady of the united states. she's here at the time warner cable arena. she's now at the podium the right there. you can see she's getting instructions, trying to begin to get a little feel for that stage up there. the teleprompter that will eventually be there. she's going to deliver a major address here, obviously, in charlotte at the democratic national convention tomorrow night. that's what the first lady will be doing. she's been here now, i'm guessing for at least 45 minutes to an hour. she was up in the sky boxes walking around, doing some television interviews, and just beginning to get a flavor for what's going on. this will be a very important address. she's very popular out there. has high, high approval and favorability numbers. there's no doubt about that. and she's going to be under enormous pressure to deliver that big speech tomorrow night. we're here in "the situation room" watching everything that's going on. gloria borger is here. brianna keilar is here. as we see the first lady, this is normal. everybody does this. all the big speakers, at some point, they come in here
forces by the date certain that the united states is going to depart. if you stop the recruitment and revet all of the troops you would extend the amount of time before the united states reaches the level where it should say to the military that it's time for us to depart. but the united states says we're going to leave at this date. so the concern would be are you now going to try to accelerate the recruitment and training. the vetting process itself works well it just hasn't been enforce ed. >> do you think that perhaps there is a possibility that the u.s. will pull out earlier? >> no, i don't think so. not at all. i think what's important is the united states and nato have demonstrated a partnership with the afghans that is really unprecedented and unmatched. the united states is going to lean into the wind. they're not going to back off because we have got this trouble spot. they are instituting the rules and regulations they have in place. they are being more aggressive about those and they are also instituting a couple of extra steps in that there might be what is known as t
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